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I won the award, but I couldn’t take it home.

The Naperville Writers’ Group awards the “Enwigger” each year to a member for Outstanding Contributions to the organization. This year I was honored to share the lovely object with likewise attractive Loretta Morris. In a fit of chivalry, I insisted that she take the award home to cherish — for the first six months, that is. I will claim the Enwigger for the last  half of the year, until the next popular vote, when it will be bestowed on another deserving writer. Meanwhile, I enjoy the warmth and fuzziness of my peers’ appreciation.

Last year I was recognized with “The Foot” Award, ostensibly for Most Improved Writer. Although also a prestigious honor, the Foot is not quite so pretty and shiny as the Enwigger. In fact, the Foot spent the previous year in an obscure corner of my library, where I could see it and enjoy its significance; but where the somewhat disturbing thing would be unlikely to invite awkward questions from visitors. Nevertheless, it’s the thought that counts.

The Path to the Spiders’ Nests

The Path to the Spiders' NestsThe Path to the Spiders’ Nests by Italo Calvino

My rating: 3 of 5 stars

Hard to judge a novel like this, knowing it’s in translation, not being familiar with Calvino at all. The tone is stark, matter-of-fact. He tells the story of young Pip, an orphan in a devastated Italian town during WWII. His sister is the dark whore of the Long Alley, who consorts and collaborates with the occupying Germans, while Pip ends up tagging along with resistance fighters up in the hills. Taking the child’s point of view is an opportunity for Calvino to write some really terse but telling descriptions of the various characters. They run the scale from dedicated communists to self-serving opportunists, and in the middle of it is Pim, who isn’t sure what he really wants. All we know is he can never return to anything like a normal life as his world has been turned upside down.

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